Cookies, Indian Cookies, biscuits
Cookies, Indian Cookies, baked goods Home 
Cookies, Indian Cookies

    - Garam Masala
    - Haldi (Turmeric)
    - Lal Mirch (Red Chilli)
    - Kali Mirch (Black Pepper)
    - Jeera (Cumin seeds)


    - Basmati Rice
    - Parmal Rice
    - White Grain Rice
    - Brown Grain Rice
    - Golden Parboiled Rice


    - Arhar dal
    - Urad dal
    - Chana dal
    - Moong dal
    - Rajma


    - Mixed Pickle
    - Mango Pickle
    - Green Chilly Pickle
    - Lime Sweet Pickle
    - Amla Pickle


    - Atta (Wheat Flour)
    - Chana Besan (Gram Flour)
    - Makki Atta (Corn Flour)
    - Chawal Atta (Rice Flour)
    - Suji (Semolina)


    - Lijjat Papad
    - Maggi Noodles
    - Top Raman Noodles
    - Gulab Jamun Mix
    - Sambhar Mix


    - Atta Cookies
    - Kaju pista Cookies
    - Jeera Cookies
    - Parle-G
    - Monaco


    - Alu Bhujia
    - Khatta Mitta Mixture
    - Masala Chana Dal
    - Namkeen Peanuts
    - Kaju Masala


    - Rasgulla
    - Ras Malai
    - Petha
    - Badam Lachha
    - Suji Halwa


    - Rasgulla
    - Sohan Papri
    - Petha
    - Kesar Rasberi
    - Suji Halwa


    - Verka Lassi
    - Rooh Afza
    - Badam Syrup
    - Frooti
    - Maaza


    - Sat Isabgol
    - Pan Parag
    - Chana Masala
    - Paneer Butter Masala
    - Pea & Mashrooms


    - Ayur - Hot Wax
    - Ayur - Cold Cream
    - Nyle Herbal Shampoo
    - Parachute Coconut Oil
    - Heena (Mehandi)


    - Steel Strainers
    - Steel Boilers
    - Steel Bowls
    - Steel Casseroles
    - Steel Plates


    - Nylon Folding Bed



     
  Indian Cookies Knowledge Base :
 
Cookies can be baked until crisp or just long enough that they remain soft, depending on the type of cookie. Some cookies are not cooked at all. Cookies are made in a wide variety of styles, using an array of ingredients including sugars, spices, chocolate, butter, peanut butter, nuts or dried fruits.

A general theory of cookies may be formulated this way. Despite their descent from cakes and other sweetened breads, the cookie in almost all its forms has abandoned water as a medium for cohesion. Water in cakes serves to make the base (in the case of cakes called 'batter') as thin as possible, which allows the bubbles – responsible for a cake's fluffiness – to form better. In the cookie the agent of cohesion has become some variation of the theme of oil. Oils, be they in the form of butter, egg yolks, vegetable oils or lard are much more viscous than water and evaporate freely at a much higher temperature than water. Thus a cake made with butter or eggs instead of water is far denser after removal from the oven.

Oils in baked cakes do not behave as water in the finished product. Rather than evaporating and thickening the mixture, they remain, saturating the bubbles of escaped gasses from what little water there might have been in the eggs, if added, and the carbon dioxide released by heating the baking powder. This saturation produces the most texturally attractive feature of the cookie, and indeed all fried foods: crispness saturated with a moisture (namely oil) that does not sink into it

 
 
 
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